Stanford University, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and other prestigious medical research institutions have flagrantly violated a federal law requiring public reporting of study results, depriving patients and doctors of complete data to gauge the safety and benefits of treatments, a STAT investigation has found.

The violations have left gaping holes in a federal database used by millions of patients, their relatives, and medical professionals, often to compare the effectiveness and side effects of treatments for deadly diseases such as advanced breast cancer.

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  • Are you doing clinical trials for stroke? Can you call me regarding clinical trials? In n Ed of help ASAP. Thanks

  • Could STAT please amend this post to separate late reports from unreported trials? Convolving the two is like saying over 22% of Canadians were assaulted or killed by criminals last year. Late reports aren’t a good thing, but they’re not anywhere near as bad as studies being quietly dropped.

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