Drug company CEO Heather Bresch affectionately describes the humble EpiPen as her “baby,” a once-middling product that she turned into a blockbuster.

With aggressive advertising — and even more aggressive price hikes — Bresch has fostered the EpiPen into a bestseller that brings in more than $1 billion a year in revenue for Mylan Pharmaceuticals.

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  • Awww… how very touching to see this shrew Bresch surrounded by pictures of her family, and crayon drawings made by one of her grandchildren. It would be so easy to sit here and wish that something bad would happen to people like Bresch or one of those that she presumably loves that is depicted in the photos she slapped on her desk and wall for this photo op, but then that would make me just as much of a lowlife as she and the rest of the pharmaceutical money grubbers are. Instead, I’ll watch and see how the elected government officials will react. It’s time to start putting some stop gaps in the system to keep pharmaceutical companies from raping people who need medications to stay alive, and those who need the peace of mind that their children, who may also depend on meds to live, will be able to afford them without having to be yet another group of people shoved into having to rely on government assistance.

  • Awww… how very touching to see this shrew Bresch surrounded by pictures of her family, and crayon drawings made by one of her grandchildren. It would be so easy to sit here and wish that something bad would happen to people like Bresch or one of those that she presumably loves that is depicted in the photos she slapped on her desk and wall for this photo op, but then that would make me just as much of a lowlife as she and the rest of the pharmaceutical money grubbers are. Instead, I’ll watch and see how the elected government officials will react. It’s time to start putting some stop gaps in the system to keep pharmaceutical companies from raping people who need medications to stay alive, and those who need the peace of mind that their children, who may also depend on meds to live, will be able to afford them without having to be yet another group of people shoved into having to rely on government assistance.

  • I have this to say to Mylan’s executives – Mylan shareholders, FIRE THEM!!
    My wife is fighting cancer. We are retired, and have Medicare . . . and the 80% coverage leaves us with medical bills, that are a strain. She has been a teacher, and gave a lot of her time to helping others outside of the classroom..
    It is disgusting how you have risen the prices on epipens, a product she must have on hand . . . all whilst your CEO and others receive obscene increases in compensation – on the backs of honest, sick women with breast cancer, and other diseases.
    How can you sleep at night? We can’t, worrying how we are going to pay for this, while your compensation continues to go up.
    Do you have no conscience? Please don’t spit out that Obamacare caused it – we are educated . . . and I EARNED my MBA!!! Disgusting. You should be ashamed of yourselves. If you have any moral fiber at all, you will cut your prices on epipens sharply . . . as in 70% . . . absent doing this, you bring shame upon yourselves, your company, and those who put in an honest days work getting only reasonable pay increases.
    You artificially jacked up prices for a product that a few short years ago was made for $58 by a German company that you bought. You didn’t even develop the product. God help us if there is ever a cure for cancer, and you get your hands on it . . . . while your neighbors, friends, and family are dying because they cannot afford your jacked up prices for cancer medication . . . just so you can pay your skyrocketing salaries and over-the-top lifestyles.
    You will be judged, not by those who accept your felonious schemes, but by those who see it for what it is . . . immoral.

    • @ Nick: Your post is so very well said and brings the reality of how these pharmaceutical companies are fleecing American citizens. These Epi Pens cost MYLAN only a few dollars to make, and yet there is a $600 price tag on them? And there is no doubt that this is simply scratching the surface on even more egregious actions and price gouging by these companies whose management teams seem to have no moral compass whatsoever. My best wishes to you and your wife.

  • You should be ashamed of themselves, the CEO may be able to afford an Epi Pen but I, a 73 year old woman allergic to bees, cannot. I’m more worried about my grandson who can’t come close to affording them. You are so disgusting to call the Epi Pen “your baby.” You are an embarrassment to women everywhere.

  • All said and don what the narration from this opinion says simply means that Ms Bresch is a good example of a free market capitalist. That the University revoked her degree amounted to nothing really since there was no other follow up to stop her benefiting from that fake grades scam.
    All other activities tied to the Mylan company were hidden inplain view not so much because of the politics of her father but due probably to the way the capitalist system operates as and is seen in the US. She made profits for the shareholders and that is [recisely what they invested for.

  • Economies of scale and larger market should have lowered manufacturing cost and improved profits. It seems Mylan is reaping benefit from both ends of the candle. I hope the greed here does not burn them.

    • @ GM: Then I believe you would be in the minority. I certainly DO hope that this price gouging comes back to bite MYLAN and the thing they have as CO, right in the keester.

  • Once again GREED raises its ugly head!! And as usual, at the expense of those that cannot afford the necessary costs to stay alive!! People and companies like Mylan should be punished and fined to the highest extent of the law. The management should be extremely ashamed to even walk down the street!!

  • a medic on an ambulance can provide the same treatment from a vial and syringe for …..1 mg vial ampule for $2.58, plus a syringe with a safe needle for $.50…..you want corruption – this is it…

  • Going after the CEO is too easy. There are a lot of contributors to this outrageous behavior. Management just executes the will of greedy investors and VCs who enable the behavior by putting their money into predatory companies in their quest to get rich quick with extreme returns on investment. Then there is Congress, without whose complete abdication of their responsibility for the American public none of this would be possible. They have known for years about the regulatory loopholes that allow this sociopathic practice to be legal. Yet, outside of making a little noise of faux outrage from time to time, do nothing that would risk alienating their pharma donors.

    Greedy unethical CEOs are a dime a dozen and they will always be with us (read Sharks in Suits about the intersection of psycopathy and executives). They can’t be shamed into changing because they simply do not have the capacity for shame. Investors and people whose careers depend on getting elected might be amenable to change through public shame, though. Maybe those people are a better target.

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