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ALO ALTO, Calif. — For Thomas P. Yacoe, the word is “terrifying.”

Leah Hemberry describes it as “constant fear.”

For Michael Tausig Jr., the terror is “beyond description.”

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All three are patients struggling with chronic pain, but what they are describing is not physical agony but a war inside the medical community that is threatening their access to painkillers — and, by extension, their work, their relationships, and their sanity.

Two years after the United States saw a record 27,000 deaths involving prescription opioid medications and heroin, doctors and regulators are sharply restricting access to drugs like Oxycontin and Vicodin. But as the pendulum swings in the other direction, many patients who genuinely need drugs to manage their pain say they are being left behind.

Doctors can’t agree on how to help them.

“There’s a civil war in the pain community,” said Dr. Daniel B. Carr, president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. “One group believes the primary goal of pain treatment is curtailing opioid prescribing. The other group looks at the disability, the human suffering, the expense of chronic pain.”

Pain specialists say there is little civil about this war.

“There’s almost a McCarthyism on this, that’s silencing so many people who are simply scared,” said Dr. Sean Mackey, who oversees Stanford University’s pain management program.

“The thing is, we all want black and white. We don’t do well with nuance. And this is an incredibly nuanced issue.”

Nuance does not matter to people like Tausig, 43, who has been unable to work or socialize since 2008, when the last of his five spinal reconstruction surgeries left him in constant pain.

He last got a taste of life without opioids a few years ago, when his pharmacy’s corporate parent imposed opioid-distribution limits, forcing him to find a new one.

“Those three days were among the worst of my life,” he said. “I wandered the house at night, legs shaking like a whirling mass of putty, sleepless and without respite from the pain.”

Now, with regulators and health industry leaders continuing to bear down on opioids, and the arrival of a new president whose statements indicate that he might further restrict opioid distribution, Tausig’s worries have deepened.

“It’s put the fear of God in me.”

Michael Tausig has been unable to work or socialize since 2008, when the last of his five spinal reconstruction surgeries left him in constant pain. Elizabeth D. Herman for STAT

The medical community’s battle over painkillers burst out into the open in late 2015, when the New England Journal of Medicine published a commentary in which two doctors argued that chronic pain patients should focus not on reducing the intensity of their pain, but on their emotional reactions to it.

The authors, Dr. Jane C. Ballantyne, the president of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing, and Dr. Mark D. Sullivan, argued patients should pursue “coping and acceptance strategies that primarily reduce the suffering associated with pain and only secondarily reduce pain intensity.”

The pair argued that patients who mainly focus on pain intensity tend to escalate their doses of opioids and worsen their quality of life.

On NEJM’s website, the comments section devolved to a flame war more suited to YouTube than the staid pages of the nation’s top medical journal, with some accusing the authors of a lack of compassion, and others lauding them for a sane approach to public health and addiction prevention.

But the comments also laid bare a fundamental problem in the debate over opioid treatments: Neither side has much evidence about the benefits or consequences of long-term use because almost no such studies exist.

A few studies have identified a litany of side effects beyond addiction. One survey, by palliative care doctors Mellar P. Davis and Zankhana Mehta, pointed to symptoms including increased risk of depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment, and sleep apnea, among other issues. Patients with lung disease were also more likely to die when their treatment included opioids, according to the survey’s authors, who practice at Geisinger Health System.

Stanford’s Mackey said those risks are important to recognize. But, he said, nearly 15,000 people die a year from anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen. “People aren’t talking about that,” he said.

Mackey says doctors being trained at Stanford’s pain center have grown increasingly fearful about prescribing opioids. Elizabeth D. Herman for STAT

On a Monday morning last month, Mackey entered an exam room to greet one of his patients who uses opioids: an 81-year-old physician with a bad back.

The doctor, who agreed to be interviewed on condition of anonymity, said he’d routinely cycled to work until relatively recently, when a degenerative spinal condition worsened. Surgery in October failed to help, and now, he told Mackey, he can only get out of bed if he takes five opioid pills at dawn and sleeps another half-hour before rising.

The doctor wanted to find a way to address his back problem without the painkillers, which, he said, cloud his thinking.

Mackey spent nearly 30 minutes with him, talking about scans, symptoms, and previous treatments. He planned a follow-up consult in January, when another set of test results would arrive.

Over lunch, Mackey reviewed the case.

“Do you get any sense from him of drug-seeking behavior?” he asked. “Is he selling this stuff on the street or trying to score some synthetic fentanyl or heroin? No. All he wants to do is be more functional so he can see patients and be relevant and have a life.”

Mackey also wasn’t sure the opioids were causing the cloudiness. The patient’s cognitive issues could be the result of non-opioid medications he takes before sleeping, so dialing down the opioids without first exploring other options might harm him more. Without them, his pain would be so severe he would be relegated to bed.

“If you’re 81 and you stop getting out of bed, it’s a slippery slope,” he said.

Mackey, a past president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine, has built Stanford’s pain center into one of the nation’s most comprehensive and well-funded pain research operations. But he said doctors being trained there have grown increasingly fearful about prescribing opioids.

“In many cases that can be healthy, but I’d like to see a thoughtful, balanced approach,” he said. “Opioids are a tool — they’re more often a fourth- or fifth-line option for me.”

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Mackey recalled the case of a patient who had crushed his foot in an accident and undergone 10 surgeries that failed to diminish his “burning, terrible pain.” The patient now relies on opioids.

“People will say, ‘This guy’s on way, way too much opioid medication, you have to take him off,’” Mackey said. “But guess what: He gets up every morning and goes to work and does his job, and he’s been on the same regimen for years and years and tried everything else first.”

Even some of Mackey’s colleagues have issues with that kind of thinking.

Dr. Anna Lembke, who practices alongside Mackey at Stanford’s pain clinic and is chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic, published a book about the opioid crisis last year. It was titled: “Drug Dealer, MD: How Doctors Were Duped, Patients Got Hooked, and Why It’s So Hard to Stop.

Lembke believes that long-term opioid use can cause patients to perceive pain even after the original cause of pain has cleared. Some patients, she said, find themselves free of pain only once they have endured the often agonizing effects of opioid withdrawal.

“That’s what we’re seeing again and again,” she said.

Lembke believes people with chronic pain who have taken opioids daily for long periods may never be able to break their dependence on the drugs, and may need permanent doses of medications like Suboxone, which is commonly given to people with opioid addictions.

But chronic pain patients who have not yet started on opioids, she said, should only take them intermittently — “like every three days or so” — to avoid addiction.

The American culture has grown too intolerant of pain, Lembke said.

“Whether it’s surgery or women going into childbirth, there’s an alarmist reaction to pain, and it’s contagious and makes more people anxious, which makes the pain worse,” she said. “We’re terrified to experience pain.”

Mackey has built Stanford’s pain center into one of the nation’s most comprehensive and well-funded pain research operations. Elizabeth D. Herman for STAT

Those who experience chronic pain say these views embolden clinicians, pharmacists, and others to treat them like addicts and criminals.

Hemberry, a 36-year-old multimedia specialist in Leavenworth, Wash., suffers from a connective-tissue disorder called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and trigeminal neuralgia, an often-excruciating nerve condition for which she occasionally takes opioids.

She heard Lembke interviewed on NPR recently and was bereft. “Every pain patient is now an addict and a failure,” Hemberry said.

Last March, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidelines for opioid prescriptions. Those guidelines focused on addiction prevention, opioid trafficking, and medication diversion, and included stern cautions against using the drugs for chronic pain.

To Hemberry, the guidelines seemed reasonable. “But many doctors and administrators have taken a hard-line ‘no opiate’ stance,” she said, and go to absurd lengths to enforce it.

“What people forget is, those who end up on opioid pain management have usually tried everything else unsuccessfully.”

Thomas P. Yacoe, who suffers from chronic migraines

Earlier this winter, Hemberry recalled, she went to the emergency room with a migraine headache, a frequent symptom of her medical conditions. She was seeking a saline drip — one of the few treatments that has helped her pain — and said she wasn’t seeking opioids.

The nursing staff nonetheless grilled her on her medications and chided her for taking too many pills, even though her daily medications are non-narcotic. She turned her head at one point and started sobbing.

Others report a similar lack of empathy.

“What people forget is, those who end up on opioid pain management have usually tried everything else unsuccessfully,” said Yacoe, 61, who suffers from chronic migraines. “I stayed away from opioids for decades. It was really and truly a last resort.”

A patient room at the Stanford University Center for Back Pain. Elizabeth D. Herman for STAT

Some clinicians trace the early roots of the opioid crisis not to the pharmaceutical industry’s marketing of controlled-release morphine pills, but to a 1986 study of 38 non-cancer patients performed by palliative care doctors at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

Most were treated with oxycodone, methadone, or levorphanol in small daily doses — less than half the surgeon general’s current recommended starting dose — and 24 reported acceptable or adequate pain relief, while two patients developed “management” problems with the drugs. (Both had histories of substance abuse.)

According to Carr, of the American Academy of Pain Medicine, the conservative opioid treatment approach used in the study, and the modest benefits reported, reflect the current practices and expectations of many doctors.

But a growing number, he said, are being pressured into a zero-tolerance policy.

“Because if one isn’t anti-opioid enough, there’ll be protests,” said Carr, who is also founding director of Tufts University’s Pain Research, Education, and Policy Program.

Other experts note that, as opioid restrictions tighten, the medical system and insurance industry have done little to support opioid-withdrawal efforts, help more physicians learn how to help patients manage pain, or enable access to alternative therapies.

In some cases, patients seeking to treat their pain have turned to street drugs like heroin or synthetic fentanyl, while others have instead chosen suicide. (In one high-profile case recently, a man who committed suicide left behind notes saying he could find no help for his chronic pain; at least two of the roughly 20 patients interviewed for this article said they had considered suicide because of their pain.)

Everyone wants the number of opioid overdoses to fall. But patients like Tausig don’t want to be made to suffer.

Tausig, a single father of two teens, said that every month he needs to fill a prescription, he’s fearful it will be denied.

Whenever he thinks he might meet with a new pharmacist or clinician, he dresses neatly to hide his tattoos. He said he thinks they can cause people to rush to judgment or even stigmatize him as an addict.

“You’ve got the wars on the medical side, but then you’ve got the governmental people stepping in, who have no idea,” Tausig said. “All they know is drugs: bad.

“They don’t see a struggling single dad in the most expensive place in the US who’s just trying to get through the day.”

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  • As I said all along the number #1 prescribed medication was, NOT is some sort of opioid. This meant pain is a previlant problem. I am concerned about the chronic long term Patients
    WE are proof that long term opioid therapy works and has for decades
    If it didn’t work we would WOULD NOT have continued it. The procedures and operations we want thru before deciding on a life lime of opioid pain relievers was a difficult but wise decision

    It is also proven that 99.99% of us take as directed because we are always UA tested and seem too pass that degrading test everytime. We also make our medicine last at least 28/30 days a month. An addict would use the no th supply in a few days to a week and then be looking for illegal drugs because we know we can’t go to another dr. The DES datA base would catch us AND WE WOULD BE IN JAIL.
    SO THIS “SHATTER PROOF IS REAL” INSULIN AND OPIOIDS ARE NOT ONLY THE MOST PRESCEIBED BUT THE MOST EXPENSIVE”
    IF ALL INSURANCE COMPANIES BACK THIS CRIMINAL INJUSTICE AND DENY OPIOID MEDICATION FOR LONG TERM CHRONIC PAIN AND PAY PEOPLE TO SPREAD THE LIES THAT ALL PEOPLE THAT TAKE PAIN RELIEVERS ARE ADDOCTS ARE CONSPIRITORS TO THIS TORTUROUS ATROCITY. IF TJE INSURANCE COMPANIES CAN GET AWAY WITH THIS, WE ARE TALKING HUNDREDS OF BILLIONS OF DOLLARS A YEAR IN CLAIMS THE DONT HAVE TO PAY. TBOS IS REALLY SAD AND TJE WORSE THING DONE TO AMERICANS SINCE AGENT ORANGE. THEDOFFERENCE IS WE ARE CIVILLIANS THAT ARE NOW GOING THRU A NEW DESEASE CALLED POST TRAUMATIC CHRONIC PAIN RELIEF DENIAL. THEIS CAUSING MORE PAIN, DEPRESSION ANXIETY AND SUICIDES AROUND THE COUNTEY AND THE INSIRANCE COMPANIES ARE SPENDING HINDREDS OF MILLIONS OF DOLLARS TO PULL THIS INHUMANE ACT .OFF. TV ADS INTERNET LOW UP ADS ALL USING THE TERM OPIOID AND HAS PILLS IN THE.PICTURE. ONLY SELDOM DO WE SEE TJE RWAL PROBLEM AND THATS THE HEROIN. THEY DONT CARE IF PEOPLE DIE FROM HEROIN. TJEY ACRUALLY COUMT ON IT. HOPING PEOPLE SEARCH THE STREETS FOR PAIN RELIEF. NOT ONLY WILL TJEY DIE FROM JEROIN , TJEU WILL ALSO SAVE THE COUNTRY DISABILITY $$$. THHATS THE SELL TO THE POLITICIANS. THEY ARE AWARE THAT RWHAB ONLY HAS A 2%/3% SUCCESS RATE AND WITH THAT COST ANALYSIS AND RISK OF SUCCESS OF SOBRIETY, THE INSURANCE COMPANIES OVER TEN YEARS WOLL SAVE OVER A TRILLION DOLLARS. THE LIVWS OF CHEONIC PAIN.PATIENTS ARE NOT WORTH THAT MUCH MONEY. I ALWAYS SAY FOLLOW THE MONEY. IT ALL STARTS AND STOPS WOTH TJE INSURANCE COMPANIES. OF WE CAN GET A FEW BERY SMART LAWYERS THAT ARE GREAT AT FORENSIC ACCOUNTING, the difference between addiction and dependence, and use the millions of us to testify,that law firm will male hundreds if millions of dollars. WE JIST WANT OUR MEDICINE BACK, THEY LAWYERS COULD HAVE THE MONEY AND JUST PUT THESE CRIMINALS and GENOCIDALMURDERERS I IN JAIL. ONLY FAMILIES THAT HAD A MOM OR DAD TAKE THIER LIFE BECAUSE THEY WERE DENIED OR THOSE THAT NOW HAVE WORSENED CONDITIONS BECAUSE MEDICATION WAS FORCED TO TAPER OR JIAT DENIED SHOULD SHOULD BE COMPENSATED AND COMPENSATED VERY WELL. THIS IS MENGELLA AND HITLER MEDICAL PRACTICE. THIN OUT THE POPULATION STARTING WITH THE DISABLED, BLACK WHITE AND HOMELESS ALONG WITH TJE WOUNDED VETS AND OUR ELDERLY USING UP MEDICARE. WE JIST NEED A FEW WITNESSES FROM THESE MEETINGS TO PROVE IT. THIS SHOULDNT BE HARD. THERE MUST HAVE BEEN EXECUTIVES WITH A CONSCIENCE THAT WOULD NOT TAKE PART. WE XOULD FIND THEM. TJE LARGEST CRIMINAL AND MALPRACTOCE CASE IN AMERICAN HISTORY.

    • Yes, it is a form of torture to take away pain meds from chronic pain sufferers.

      I go to a pain management clinic and take an in-office and a laboratory test every time I go, every 28 days. Now this is frustrating the insurance company because they don’t see the need for a monthly test after a certain period of time. Say, the first 6 months and then 4 times a year for an expensive qualitative lab analysis. The monthly in office test would be sufficient to show the presence of your meds but not quantity. That’s where the every 3 month qualitative test comes in. My insurance is balking at the every 28 day qualitative test because it costs about $1500 a pop. This is law in my state though. The state is requiring it.

      With all that said, I work. I’ve had illness and pain for about 13 years. My case is unusual because the pain was caused by exposure to toxigenic mold at my workplace. I went from Superman working two Engineering jobs to barely being able to make it to work. They said I have fibromyalgia. In reality mold poisoning looks identical to fibromyalgia but it carries many more symptoms not part of fibro. Neurological symptoms. It affected my CNS (brain, nerves, vision, cognition, memory, etc.) rather severely. That has not improved much in all the years after I was moved out of the toxic building. The damage is done. I’m ate up with arthritis and both hips will need replaced in the future due to steroids that caused necrosis in the ball joint at the end of the femur. I have flu like symptoms every day, i.e., aching and muscle pain. Back pain, knee pain, neck, just joint pain in general. I was desperate and took every drug they gave me to try to help. None worked except for opiates. This has kept me working. If they get pulled from me, I will have to file disability. I’m a fed employee so the disability is sweet. That is, the money is good (what good is money though when you feel like death 24/7). I’ll actually be better off financially to go on Fed Employee Disability than to work. If I could make it to retirement in 15 years, I’ll draw about 20 to 30% of my pay. On disability it’s 75%. So instead of being a burden on society and doing what’s really best for me, I have continued to work. Take away my oxycodone IR and ER and there’s no way I could get out of bed at 6:30 am. I also have a lot of problems dealing with people at work because I appear to be okay. That’s due to pain meds. Without them I’d hobble, limp, and sit at my desk like a zombie. Some folks who don’t understand opiate pain meds may think it gets you high or drunk feeling but that’s not the case. Not for me. It clears my thinking and gives me energy to do my job, and it takes the throbbing and stabbing pain away so I can concentrate. I have to work really hard to do my job even with the meds due to the neurological dysfunction from the mold toxins. Imagine being an electronic circuit design engineer having had your brain fried by mold!! It’s not easy but I do it and do a good job. I wish people had more empathy but most don’t these days. They can be very cruel and that’s what taking away pain medication is as well: torturous cruelty. It’s my life and my body. Without it, I doubt I’d want to live. Even taking it I never get out of pain. I’ve learned to endure some pain. I take what most people would probably consider as stage four cancer level pain medicine. But most don’t know that fibro and severe mold toxicity as well, are equivalent to stage four cancer pain according to doctors. So why would someone want to deprive me of pain reduction? What business is it of theirs? Well, I got news for all these detractors. One day THEY will have severe pain more than likely and how their mind will change if it is themselves who get denied the only thing that works!! Few people escape life without suffering pain for any number of reasons. Number one is probably bac

  • I think it’s great that you all are offering this service but are these stories or blogs whatever you call them, are they making a difference? Is the medical field or government feeling any pressure from this ,or is it in one ear and out the other.

    • Get back to me in 8 weeks w/that ???HOPEFULLY,, they will feel the wrath of all of us then!!!!!IN the mean time,look up the guys who paid off our government for this willfull torture/genocide upon the medically ill in physical pain,,ie,,”Shatter Proof,”,,,maryw

  • It’s scary to read all these post and realize new stories the same as mine over and over and over and over and it doesn’t seem to bother anybody the ones who don’t hurt say oh well get over it the ones that do hurt I guess we’re all Junkies and what’s a junkie Worth right! At the beginning of my long battle with chronic pain they told Dr we were being under prescribed so after years of piloting into my system well now Americans are being over-prescribed thay say.so what now I ran out of doctors so I sit with no new ideas how to get relief. The ironic part of all this is that most of the people with chronic pain was caused by the medical industry whether it be side effects from other drugs surgeries that promise to fix any problem you have and Magic pills it’s all false. Well I’ve said a mouthful I can go on bitching forever. I truly hope the ones making these decisions for our lives never have to go through what we’re going through.

    • I am glad you can stay so calm about it Darren. I would like to put every one of those Nannies on a rack and stretch em out until their eyes fall out.

  • There is an agenda behind wiping out opiates. Likely it is to make way for Government bodies to control the distribution of new cannabis based alternatives. And to make way for Big Pharma, Hospitals, Insurance and Providers to make the profit and prevent/stop the private sector from continuing to profit from marijuana sales. Opiates are cheap. Pharmaceuticals that are marajuaina based will be costly to the consumer. The Government and bodies such ad the FDS want to control the marajuaina industry. Providers want to benefit from the massive profit. Both do not want the private sector to control and profit from this industry. Effective new drugs are always extremely expensive to the consumer and heavily controlled to protect profit.

    • If profit were the first major concern… There would be no reason to prevent the private sector from controlling it. In fact, it’s because of privatization in the US that costs to the consumer are so damn high.

  • To all,,,who are being denied access to effective medical care to lessen effectively physical pain from painful medical conditions,,I wanted to take the time to at least share with you all,,,who is responsible for 90 % of all us being torture as adults.We know a guy kolodyn,,but,,,who is payen/backen kolodyn..I strongly suggest anyone who is interested to look up a little group called curiously, ‘Shatter Proof,”….If I could add attachment here,,I would do it myself..But a group of ,”payee contributors ,” are with-in this group,,,any guess who these guys are??Blue cross,,blue shield,,Cigna,,several several big insurance companies,malpractice insurers of hospitals’ are involved financially w/Shatter Proof,”Now from a laymen perspective,,its a little to convenient that these insurer’s want pain management wiped off the map..After all,,,if physical pain is no-longer acknowledge,,,so is any pain/suffering/medical errors that hospital,,that doctors has made,,This could also be called the ,”dark side,” of medicine…We maybe laymen,,but us laymen are not the ones killing off the chronically medically ill are we?!
    Us laymen are not the ones putting out a ,”witch hunt,” on a medicine that when used,acknowledge as a medicine,,,as it is,,, obviously helps a lot of people….But something to chew on folks,,why,,,would all the big insurance companies want acknowledgement of physical pain wiped off any medical records,surveys etrc…..for me,,,its obvious,.Also to make Shatter Proof a 501c,,,when u have big financial players,,is also very curious. If u take the time to go thru ,”Shatter Proofs,” web-site,,,u will see, the gladly admit all the political ,”lobbying,” they have done,,to destroy us,our medicine,our laws that once protected us,our doctors etc and all the false data,,using only people who despised opiates in their research papers,,Also Harvard is over there w/Shatter Proof,,,,but the big one for me,,that proved this had nothing to do w/real medicine,real practice of medicine,,,,but,,the share desire by big companies w/monies to do evil to the weakest in society,,the chronically medically ill,,,was when I saw ”SoberAmerica,” in there as one of the contributors, That group is 100 % about prohibition only,,,and notta about the practice of real medicine,acknowledging opiates r a medicine,,just like insulin,,,Again,,I suggest any who reads this ,”blog,” if u want answers to who did this to us,our medicine and our doctors,,,go take a look at Shatterproof ENTIRE website,,,maryw

    • pss,,despite proving there is pure corrupted evil that has done this to us,,the truth/fact still remains,,That denial to access to effective medicine to lessen severe physical pain is torture,torturing another human being to death is genocide,,It is physically impossible for anyone to physically feel the physical pain of another,and why,,the decision was/should be left to our physician’s and us.These big powers who did this to us,our medicines and the doctors who once treated us,,truly think they had the right to decide,who will suffer to death in agony and who will not.The shear arrogance it must take to even think u have the right to torture another living soul literally to death,is criminal,and Torture is criminal,abusing your position as a government employee to unlawfully change laws,defintion and reserach that has stood for over 100 years in illegal and they should all be brought up on charges of torturing the medically ill via corrupted use of power and monies,,Some should be charged w/murder for all of us who had to use death to stop physical pain that was once control w/the medicine opiates,,maryw

  • My (now former) so-called pain management doctor arbitrarily took away the most effective medication (for me) Also, I was told that what works for others will have to work for me too, even though they were all tried (unsuccessfully) in the past. In addition to insomnia caused by increased severe pain, FEAR has been added to my life. FEAR of hurting WORSE, FEAR of worsening depression. I cried in the office explaining my fears and worries. The day of my next appointment I got a call and was told I was being discharged as a
    patient, and would no longer be treated. So, they take away my pain meds and left me to try to fend for myself. It’s no wonder so many people consider suicide to escape from pain. I am miserable, sad, and very unhappy. And I hurt BAD. Why did he knowingly refuse effective treatment (I NEVER, EVER misused, abused or not used my needed medicine) I’ve never had a doctor intentionally hurt me or knowingly increase pain. What am I supposed to do? My life is essentially ruined because now I can’t DO ANYTHING. NO activity. I can’t do chores, I cannot handle my responsibilities, I cannot concentrate or focus on the most minor task anymore due to pain that was successfully kept in check before. Giving up appears to be an option, now.

  • So tired or people who have no clue making decisions that are best for me because a study says so. I spent 26 years in the Army made it to Panama, Desert Storm, Iraq X3 and Afghan once. I am at 100% disability due to injuries due to IED and other types of battlefield explosions and injuries. Needless to say in quite a bit of pain on a regular basis. I have always been honest with my Dr.’s if I needed less I would say so but now being told sorry nothing I can do for you. I understand why someone would take their life instead of living in pain like this every day. As for me and other soldiers like me works for the VA system they can get rid of us quicker instead of taking care of us.

  • If pain medicine causes more pain than if I break a bone and you give me a pain pill, according to your thoughts the pill will cause more pain. BS it will take away some of the pain.

  • My comment is this I. Have been on a very large amount of pain killers from fentenal patch’s and oxi contain to methadone to opana 40 er and a20 er. Twice a day and 10 it for breakthrough. I have gotten robbed had to pay out of pocket for my meds.itz horrible my own son stole from .me got me kicked out of 2 clinics so I put him in rehab I moved in with . my mom and now I am having a hard time finding a clinic please help me JoAnn Foltz 17242172186

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