Amid a rising toll of opioid overdoses, recommendations discouraging their use to treat pain seem to make sense. Yet the devil is in the details: how recommendations play out in real life can harm the very patients they purport to protect. A new proposal from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to enforce hard limits on opioid dosing is a dangerous case in point.

There’s no doubt that we needed to curtail the opioid supply. The decade of 2001-2011 saw a pattern of increasing prescriptions for these drugs, often without attention to risks of overdose or addiction. Some patients developed addictions to them; estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention range from 0.7 percent to 6 percent. Worse, opioid pills became ubiquitous in communities across the country, spread through sale, theft, and sharing with others, notably with young adults.

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  • I have broken my neck twice c1 and c6 I have extremely bad insomnia went through many sleep studies. All the Dr say is I’m wired different. I have heard this about 8 times from different Drs I have like electricity running through my chest and it makes me not sleep 17 days I went had a Grand maul seizure that’s when I broke my c6 only thing that works is morph and klonpin and seraquil I have had 2 knee surgery 2 torn rotator cuffs. Bad back. Lordosious. Not sure how to spell that. Anyway the list goes on cancer also. I wanted to cut back. But when they went to war on the innocent hard working Americans it got worse. They took away 80 percent of my meds. If they take away anymore I won’t be able to sleep. My neck hurts so bad it gives me a headache and it makes me sick to my stomach. I use to weigh 235 I’m 6’7” and I’m down to 165. Why do they hate the hard working people so much. I mean we pay tons of taxes. Do they want us on disability. I’ve been working since the age of 10 on a farm. I’m now 59 and always in pain. Can someone please help us. I don’t sell it I take it as prescribed. Does anyone care.

    • The govt doesn’t care, that’s for damn sure. They steal taxes from you and care not if you suffer. Mercenary politician scum.

  • I am 72, knee surgery, shoulder surgery, two hip replacements, surgery on all lumbar vertebra. I cannot do normal daily functions and feel the politicians are torturing me and others like me. We have no where to turn.

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