The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention isn’t simply concerned about prevention of disease in the United States. The agency’s quarantine program — 50 years old this year — is designed to keep disease threats from abroad at bay.

That mandate even applied to disease threats from outer space. If you’re old enough to remember the first moon landing, you’ll recall the returning astronauts could not be reunited with their families until they’d spent 21 days in a containment unit on a ship in the Pacific Ocean. Moon rocks we wanted. Moon bugs, no thanks.

Today the CDC’s quarantine program operates 20 stations strategically placed around the country — at airports, land borders, and seaports.

CDC Quarantine
Until the 1950s, the US Public Health Service used to use cutters to carry quarantined inspectors to incoming ships. Cargo and passenger ships were required to fly the yellow quarantine flag until inspectors could assess and clear the health of passengers and crew. DGMQ Director Martin Cetron, MD
CDC Quarantine
US public health officers in the 1940s examine a sick crew member onboard a cargo ship. Today, cargo and cruise ship captains on international voyages must notify CDC of any deaths and certain illnesses among passengers and crew before arriving at a US seaport. DGMQ Director Martin Cetron, MD
CDC Quarantine
In 1944, a US public health officer keeps busy while waiting to respond to the next call. US Public Health Service, National Library of Medicine
CDC Quarantine
A 1940s photo depicts the US Quarantine Station in Laredo, Texas. People crossing from Mexico to Texas were sent to this station if they were sick or needed their medical records reviewed. Today, the CDC’s Quarantine Stations in El Paso, Texas, and San Diego continue to respond to illnesses at the southern border. National Archives
CDC Quarantine
In 1969, the CDC helped set up a quarantine protocol for the Apollo 11 astronauts after their first walk on the moon. They were quarantined for 21 days in a mobile unit aboard the USS Hornet in the Pacific. President Richard Nixon welcomes home astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins. NASA
CDC Quarantine
In the 1940s, US public health officers look for any sick travelers as passengers disembark from a European flight. Courtesy Martin Cetron/CDC

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  • When foreigners invade America illegally, they bypass health screenings and spread their 3rd world diseases to Americans.

    We are now experiencing a recrudescence of many diseases once considered eradicated in the US.
    Polio, TB, pink eye that can’t be treated, bed bugs, measles, influenza, Zika, dengue fever, polio and the new polio-like disease, and many many more are dragged here by people entering illegally without any health screenings.

    They are coming from countries that their bad citizenship has let collapse so there is no public health and no medical care.
    So they are infected when they arrive.

    They also were too socially incompetent to install plumbing in their native countries, so everyone defecates in the open, just squatting anywhere. (Although women try to hide in the bushes to escape rape.)

    This practice infects everyone with diseases of the intestines like salmonella, parasitic worms, listeria, and E. coli.

    Then they bring their infections and their habits to America, defecating right on our food crops when they get work in the fields.

    This is the reason for the big increase in food-borne diseases. It started in California in the 1960s and got worse lately with the new flood of illegal aliens.

    They are also too socially incompetent to organize public health measures such as vaccinations, so they are not vaccinated against common diseases.
    The measles outbreak at Disneyland was because ot the high percent of unvaccinated illegal aliens.

    Our government needs to step up its game to prevent these people from entering here and spreading their dangerous diseases.

    Since they were unable to provide education in their home countries, they don’t know any

  • 1. “quarantine” inspectors, not “quarantined.”
    2. Cutters were still being used when CDC the program was transferred to CDC in 1967.

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