WASHINGTON — Representative Tom Cole, a Republican from Oklahoma, loves the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. When he’s asked about public health funding, he often recites a favorite factoid: “You’re much more likely to die in a pandemic than in a terrorist attack.”

But before the House passed the American Health Care Act on Thursday, Cole — who chairs the appropriations subcommittee that oversees health spending — would not say how Congress would replace the nearly $1 billion in grants the bill would strip from the CDC and other federal agencies if it becomes law. Those grants, from what’s known as the Prevention and Public Health Fund, made up one-eighth of the CDC’s funding in 2016.

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  • Good because CDC and NIH only fund research based on assumptions. Let’s give the available money to the true researchers that are not biased

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