T

wo years ago, Jonathan Scheiman grabbed a Zipcar and, for lack of a better term, turned it into a traveling pooper-scooper.

He cruised through Boston and Cambridge every day, picking up fecal samples from runners training for the Boston Marathon and storing them on dry ice. His aim: seeing if the bounties of bacteria found in the samples contained any secrets to the runners’ athletic success, and determining whether it would be possible to resettle such bacteria into the bodies of others.

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  • Check the urine instead, and you will find the answer as in the 2015 Boston Marathon winner doping on EPO. As a former rugby player our secret is that we play with leather balls.

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