Mylan may have overcharged taxpayers as much as $1.27 billion over 10 years for its signature EpiPens, according to an analysis released Wednesday by the Department of Health and Human Services’s watchdog.

The pharmaceutical company has been in hot water for potentially misclassifying its signature epinephrine auto-injector in a way that enabled it to charge a higher price to Medicaid. Because the pens were classified as generic, rather than brand-name products, Mylan paid Medicaid a 13 percent instead of a 23 percent rebate — despite the company being told its classification was incorrect. That allegation came to light in the fall.

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