WASHINGTON — When the Trump administration unveiled a new Medicare proposal this week to cut payments to hospitals as part of a drug reimbursement program, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price called the plan a “significant step toward fulfilling President Trump’s promise to address rising drug prices.”

It may not be that simple.

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  • If the drug companies didn’t advertise on TV and in magazines, they wouldn’t need to charge do much. The general public cannot but direct, so why market to public? Direct marketing to physicians, hospital, and trade magazines
    should be the only marketing drug companies are allowed.

  • Simple? Yes. When you are charged $100 for an antibiotic prescription in the USA and it is sold in India by the same company for $4, something is fishy. Subsidizing healthcare, big pharma, where does it end?

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