Biotech needs a T-shirt rule.

It works like this: When you buy a new T-shirt, an old T-shirt — faded, torn, embarrassing to wear in public — must be thrown away. My partner imposed the T-shirt rule on our house (well, on me, actually) because she got tired of dealing with drawers, closets, and boxes overflowing with ratty T-shirts, some dating back to my college days.

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  • Adam, biotech companies are like dotcom companies. They don’t require large amounts of capital or people to get started, which is why they are always popping up. As someone once said all you need to convince the VC guys is a Brooks Brothers tie and a slick Powerpoint presentation.

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