This feels all too familiar.

After watching the violence unfold in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend, after watching white supremacists descend on the city where I went to medical school, and onto the University of Virginia campus where I became a doctor, this is what I said to myself.

Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT Plus and enjoy your first 30 days free!

GET STARTED

What is it?

STAT Plus is STAT's premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.

What's included?

  • Daily reporting and analysis
  • The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters
  • Subscriber-only newsletters
  • Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day
  • Online intelligence briefings
  • Frequent opportunities to engage with veteran beat reporters and industry experts
  • Exclusive industry events
  • Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country
  • The best reporters in the industry
  • The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry
  • And much more
  • Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.

Leave a Comment

Please enter your name.
Please enter a comment.

  • “Jennifer Adaeze Okwerekwu is a second-year resident in psychiatry and a columnist for STAT. She received her MD from the University of Virginia in the spring of 2016. Jennifer is passionate about exploring the intersection between medicine and media. She worked as a medical student producer for “The Dr. Oz Show” and as an intern for CNN’s medical unit, Radio Disney, and the Kaiser Family Foundation Health Reporting Program. Jennifer graduated from Harvard University in 2010 where she majored in visual and environmental studies (film studies) and minored in health policy. In 2011, she received a Master of Science in narrative medicine from Columbia University.”

    What’s narrative medicine? Is that like normal medicine except you talk about being a doctor? Your bio reads like somebody who is more interested in being in the spotlight rather than fixing people’s physical ailments. Are you a real Medical Doctor or just a Psychiatrist.

    • Close. Its a new branch of psychology that studies patient narratives as a way to improve interactions between doctors, nurses, social workers, therapists, etc.

      I agree on the spotlight. Everything is fairly controversial that I’ve seen her write (and I can be wrong, for the record). I would want to know what kind of patient stories she is doing, because there are a ton of harmed patients out there who would want their narratives made in such a way they aren’t left to suffer or any one else suffers. I don’t see that bent in her writings.

    • It saddens me to read your response to her opinion. As a resident of Charlottesville “Cville” as often called by locals., I was not surprised when I heard of the violence that took place. Many Colored and Hispanic people are often discriminated against on a daily basis, be it confrontational or indirect racism. I can not shy away from the fact that I also am a victim of this barbarous acts. However, the career interest of the writer should not be a topic of discussion. You should be thinking of how to contribute your positive quota to end this act of violence and injustice. I pray you do not experience discrimination of any form in your life. Stay positive!

  • I enjoyed your article, thank you for speaking up and continuing in the field of medicine to make a difference!

A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day in science and medicine

Privacy Policy