Until recently, the human microbiome languished in relative obscurity. But now it’s drawn all kinds of attention from medicine and from commerce — and three of the field’s star researchers are being recognized for their efforts to advance the field.

“I’m delighted that it’s the microbiome in the spotlight this year,” said Rob Knight, one of this year’s winners of the University of California, San Diego’s prestigious Massry Prize. Knight, a professor and the director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation at UCSD, is sharing the $200,000 prize with Dr. Jeffrey Gordon, a professor at Washington University in St. Louis, and University of Colorado professor Norman Pace; as part of the prize, all will give lectures at the University of Southern California in October.

Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT Plus and enjoy your first 30 days free!

GET STARTED

What is it?

STAT Plus is STAT's premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.

What's included?

  • Daily reporting and analysis
  • The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters
  • Subscriber-only newsletters
  • Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day
  • Online intelligence briefings
  • Frequent opportunities to engage with veteran beat reporters and industry experts
  • Exclusive industry events
  • Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country
  • The best reporters in the industry
  • The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry
  • And much more
  • Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.

Leave a Comment

Please enter your name.
Please enter a comment.

  • I should point out thst products used for fecal transplantation are NOT approved by the FDA. They are defined as experimental and thus must be performed under an IND.

A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day in science and medicine

Privacy Policy