F

acing a barrage of lawsuits for its alleged role in seeding the opioid crisis, Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, is countering with a public outreach campaign meant to show it is doing its part to stem the epidemic.

The company last week launched an advertising campaign in national newspapers, Washington publications, and local papers in its home state of Connecticut. In a statement, Purdue said the ads were part of a broader “long-term initiative,” but declined to provide details about what else would be included beyond the advertisements.

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  • I don’t think anyone would argue that there is a need for pain killers like the ocy compounds – the point is not that Perdue produced an effective pain killer that should be part of the materia medica, but that Perdue cynically and deliberately fostered the use of their addictive (and no this is not a case of individual responsibility – these are addictive substances) medication by encouraging off-label prescription and using the kind of hard sell that we used to associate with the door to door world. Perdue made a lot of money and a lot of people died – not the people in great and possibly terminal pain for whom the drugs were appropriate, but people with pain that could have, should have, been managed in other ways with no, or substantially less, risk, or who had access because in the early years Perdue and their distribution network were flooding the country with pills. These medications are appropriate in certain circumstances, not in others. Perdue crossed the line and the many millions they have been fined and are now shelling out for full page hand wringing ads in the New York Times and other publications don’t even begin to scratch the level of compensation they should be held accountable for.

  • …echoing the above. And if you’re making so much money that you can afford multiple full page ads in the NYT, what does that say about the success of what in any other universe would be considered a criminal enterprise? I’ve developed a reflex cringe every time I enter a Sackler branded building.

  • In regards to this opioid crises. I am a chronic pain patient that has had my life destroyed due to 20 surgeries in the past 17 years with most of the surgeries being botched, almost killing me, literally. The reason, the doctors and nurses didn’t listen to me, only to later find out that I was telling the truth putting me in the chronic pain group of people that need these medications to just get out of bed. I see a pain management doctor, that’s what he does, but the CDC and CMS have scared these doctors with threats of loosing their license, among other things. So out of the blue on a visit this year I get my pain meds cut in half. What life I had was barely tolerable and now it just plain sucks. I have done everything under the sun that didn’t involve opioids but unfortunately those procedures didn’t work very well if at all. There has to be a way for the people that need these meds to be allowed to have them, after all the doctor wouldn’t prescribe them if he didn’t think they were needed.

    • I completely agree with you!
      On a different note, I’ve had 2 response’s to my comments. I can’t see either one? It doesn’t even have the “reply” under my last comment. Do you know how I can find them? I want to see them because I really want people to know the Truth about all of this! Maybe they are asking for more information?

  • STAT you guys are so much better than this…you can’t give your readers basic background that Purdue pled guilty to a federal charge in 2007 of lying to doctors about the addictive nature of their drug? I thank you for the wonder job (along with the expense) you did by suing Perdue in KY. But, it’s important to inform your readers about all the facts regarding Purdue’s behavior verses their PR.

    • Yes, it Can be addictive If you have the addiction issue. It is the Responsiblity of the Patients NO one else. Unless your adopted, then there is no excuse for not knowing if addiction runs in the family. People Need to Stop Blaming everyone and everything else except for themselves! Many products are Dangerous to our health and lives, but no one cares about those! Opioid meds are needed by people with chronic pain. Most Hate taking them, but don’t have a choice if they want to function and not suffer horribly. Just because some people Want to get high using pills when they can’t get what they really want is no excuse for everyone to be So ignorant to the truth. It’s not because everyone is bad, it’s our own government that’s been lying to us about pills being a big part of our epidemic! I’m not saying you or others are jerks. I know that we have all been lied to, but it’s aggravating because I have done research and found out it’s pure BS. The opioid pill epidemic was manufactured by our government For big pharma! The truth is that Less than 2% of all Legally prescribed opioid meds are abused in any way. Only 4.5% of all overdose deaths are from pills, But that does not take other things into consideration. How many were CPP that were intentionally committing suicide, or the illegal phentanyl pills?! There is So much truth out there, but you have to look for it because our government only lies to us!

    • Death is harsh but hitting them with regulation is what is necessary and that is why we should FUND our government with taxes that are fair…to protect citizens. Proper regulation of Big Business who are addicted to their inflated profits are thwarted by lobbyists and corrupt elected officials who let them get their profit and tax loophole fixes…enabling.

    • Kev, I take it you’ve never seen someone suffering from terminal bone cancer. My father-in-law suffered with it for a year before finally passing. To be specific, he had a fast-growing tumor in his groin, which had also attached itself to his pelvic bone. In other words, this man could not sit, stand, recline, lie down, etc. in any kind of comfort. Purdue’s OC kept him out of some of the worst possible pain. Same with my dad. When you see a loved one suffering pure hell and agony, you will one day recognize the need for each of these medications, including OC, have on those who suffer. This “intentional poison” kept two of my loved ones from blowing their brains out due to physical agony that you and I could not take for even a day.

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