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UELPH, Ontario — Outside of Emma Allen-Vercoe’s office is a bulletin board pinned with her team’s scientific papers since 2013. It’s the academic’s answer to a military uniform grown heavy with medals.

But all of that research has come with a side effect: an impressive intimacy with the smells of human digestion.

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  • Developing laboratories to replicate the functionality of each component can be the beginning of building labs that simulate systems and ultimately the whole body. Concurrently, a science and engineering model of the body should be created on a computer to study the functionality of components, systems, and the whole body.

  • Interesting article on a topic that we don’t usually thinking about. It makes perfect sense.

    Thank you, Emma Allen-Vercoe, and those who work in the “poopy lab” at the University of Guelph. T

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