John Arnold is legendary for turning contrarian bets into heaps of money. The soft-spoken Texan was a whiz kid trader at Enron before its fall. He then ran his own hedge fund, specializing in energy trading. Before he turned 34, he was a billionaire.

He can afford his prescription drugs.

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  • I am forever perplexed by these pricing discussions.

    THE REST OF THE WORLD pays 50-80% less for the SAME drugs as we do !! What do people not get here??!!

    It’s been rapacious and borderline illegal. And quietly, during the Obama Administration, the generic companies consolidated into 5, and allowed them to raise prices by 5-10x.

    This is easy – cut prices to the level of Canada and the UK.

    Done – what’s next ??

  • ” (The [Arnold] foundation funds Prasad’s work on overturned medical dogma but not his research on drug pricing.)”

    well, ok then. i feel so much better now.

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