WASHINGTON — It’s been touted by health officials for almost a year: a planned opioids research partnership worth roughly $400 million. Ideally, the National Institutes of Health and the pharmaceutical industry would each pick up half the tab, NIH Director Francis Collins has said, to fund research aimed at addressing the opioid epidemic.

Collins reiterated last month: Dozens of drug companies were on the verge of teaming up with the agency, which researchers hope will lead to the discovery of new medicines to treat addiction or serve as alternatives to opioids.

Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT Plus and enjoy your first 30 days free!

GET STARTED

What is it?

STAT Plus is STAT's premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.

What's included?

  • Daily reporting and analysis
  • The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters
  • Subscriber-only newsletters
  • Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day
  • Online intelligence briefings
  • Frequent opportunities to engage with veteran beat reporters and industry experts
  • Exclusive industry events
  • Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country
  • The best reporters in the industry
  • The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry
  • And much more
  • Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.

Leave a Comment

Please enter your name.
Please enter a comment.

  • It is really no wonder that we have the most expensive and least effective healthcare in the world. These agencies were undermined years ago, and they still refuse to look at Facts. The use of our Federal Agencies, by the interests they were supposed to regulate has been obscenely profitable. They created the opiate epidemic, and are still profiting from the misery. The FDA and the NIH chose to peddle pseudo science, and provide a good platform for marketing it to the vulnerable. We are in the land of Alternate Facts.

  • I have no other option but to take morphine daily or I would have no life at all. It has been a blessing that we live in an age that pain can be treated. I agree too many people do not use them correctly and they are hurting people like me who do not abuse them but need them. I haven’t had a dose change in almost 10 years. So why am I having to jump through new hoops to get the same medication(s) I have been on and stable for the last 10 years? Please don’t assume that everyone needs to be off these medications or assume that we are all abusers? It is my treatment for the very real and debilitating pain that my doctors told me would have to be treated medically (pain management with opioid meds) because everything else, surgeries, chiro, acupuncture, massage, all temporary measures weren’t working. I’m afraid the pendulum is swinging too far over and away from reason. I fear that if my pain isn’t treated because someone arbitrarily makes that decision and I cannot get the meds, then I will end up being a suicide statistic because I won’t be able to deal with the pain. Where is the voice of reason in all of this mess?????

  • When I worked at The NIH, I synthesized a new class of compounds named The Benzomorphans which wer/are potent painkillers and antigonists.
    Then, Smith, Kline and French o f Philadelphia was awarded the application to market the medicinal products, Phenazocine, and two other painkillers.
    They are fast acting, do not reduce respiration, can be taken orally and do not support addition. Why not rescue these compounds and consider them
    for use after testing?

    • I’d love to speak with you about your experience at the NIH. I am active in an organization (atipusa.org) which focuses on the needs of individuals with intractable pain conditions. I would appreciate your perspective. If interested, please email me at sally@atipusa.org or respond on our website. Thank you.

A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day in science and medicine

Privacy Policy