DUNWOODY, Ga. — Three years ago, with the opioid epidemic taking off, police officers in this affluent Atlanta suburb noticed an uptick in overdoses. Sgt. Robert Parsons rushed to equip his fellow officers with a lifesaving tool: the opioid antidote naloxone.

He stumbled across a drug company that was donating free cartons of naloxone auto-injectors to police agencies, and placed an order online. Within months, he had revived a man. But the following spring, when another batch of naloxone arrived, he was surprised to find that the injectors were set to expire in four months.

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  • Really, Prof. Beletsky, destroying short-dated naloxone is more ethical than donating? Peculiar ethics as practiced at Northeastern U.

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