WASHINGTON — For at least six months, staffers in the Office of National Drug Control Policy — often political appointees in their 20s — have crossed 17th Street, entered the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, and sat through weekly meetings of an “opioids cabinet” chaired by Kellyanne Conway.

Then they have returned to their desks and reported back to veteran career staff — who have listened, often with disappointment, to the ideas proposed by Conway and Katy Talento, a domestic policy adviser.

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  • As we get older our bodies simply wear out. We all do it. Much like a car does. In these instances we need specialists in AC, wheel alignment, electrical and of course body work.
    Grandchildren do not need to see the medications our parents and grandparents take (if they are still living). It is called better living thru chemistry.
    The GP is necessary for referral for insurance purposes and serves as a “gatekeeper” to our health.
    I almost forgot the psychiatrist. You will need one of these as well as our anxiety increases and perhaps the coatings our nerves wears thin.
    I am not comfortable with a freelance (novice) writing articles about advanced health and various physicians we need.
    Life is an education. We (you) do not fully appreciate an illness or death until you have experienced it first hand for your health.

  • I wonder if this has something to do with the problems at the DEA and the ONDCP.

    Addiction is a medical problem – Trump
    http://classicalvalues.com/2018/05/trump-and-congress-have-an-addiction-plan/
    And on cannabis would you believe that Sen “Indian” Warren and Sen Gardner (R-CO) have introduced a bill? With Trump’s approval.
    http://classicalvalues.com/2018/06/federal-pot-legalization-bill-introduced/

    A position Trump has held for almost 30 years.
    http://www.ocregister.com/articles/company-744807-trump-joke.html

  • This may help you to understand where I’m coming from. I have no problem with people with chronic pain trying to get relief. I do have a problem with looking to only drugs to get relief from pain, or a cold. I’m from the generation who knew their family doctor so well they even made house calls, on occasion. I take two of my friends who are both on Medicare to their doctors’ appointments, & have been for the past two years. What I see happening is they go to these specialists, including pain doctors, & are prescribed drugs for whatever issue they are experiencing…back pain, stomach problems, depression, dizziness. The specialists are not trained in wholistic medicine & solely prescribe drugs. That ends up causing more side effects. The doctor followip appointments NEVER end…and neither do the ailments. It’s a “puppy mill” of drug prescriptions! Here is that article:
    http://www.dailypress.com/news/military/dp-nws-hampton-va-opioids-20180119-story,amp.html

    We are, in general, relying on prescription drugs, way too often. When kids see their parents & grandparents using profusely, they get the message that drugs are okay.

    • Nancy no it doesn’t explain your stand!
      My medical information is not your business!
      But to try and open your narrow view I have several drs and my counselor who at very involved with my chronic pain management!
      I do physical therapy, see my therapist, have done alternative treatments to include acupressure acupuncture and reiki, daily three times a day stretching. We have tried other non narcotic meds that caused worse side effects than my pain meds.
      So you have no idea what all of the law abiding CPP do with their full circle care! This is just a few things I do as part of my care in addition to my pain meds. Nuff said and no more time is going to be given to you ! We aren’t the enemy!

  • Whatever political appointee is in charge, you can begin by re-educating physicians as to our/your expectations. Like the NRA is to guns, big PHARMA is to doctors.
    I recently had miniscus surgery. I rarely take any medications with the exception of over the counter allergy meds. My doctor prescribed 30 Percocet for my post op discomfort…Actually I never had any discomfort! I didn’t even need Ibprophen. I still have the 30 Percocet pills in my bathroom drawer. A society that reveres drugs as the solutions to all pain, discomfort & ailments, will continue to produce addicts & drug abusers, just like a society that reveres guns will produce school shooters. Change the message & we may get better outcomes.

    • I think it’s wonderful that you didn’t need your pain meds after surgery and applaud you for leaving them alone. However, there are millions of people that have been living with chronic pain for more than 10 years and I happen to be one of them. Pain is a thief. It steals your life as you once knew it. Unless you have experienced that kind of pain and what that chronic long term pain takes from you then you shouldn’t be a part of the solution to the opioid problem. Those of us that can’t function physically without it don’t have a problem taking
      drug tests, monitoring, or any other type of controlled treatment. We do want opioids to stop getting into the wrong hands. We want doctors to stop prescribing to people that don’t really need it. But cutting doses back for those of us that suffer is not necessary. We are not the problem. We deserve compassion while new regulations are developed to protect the people that are using the drugs for recreational purposes and from those that are selling their drugs rather than taking them . There are simple steps that can be taken to cut 80 % of these abuses. It’s not that complicated. So I’m saying that the illegal use and sell of opioids can be curbed while ensuring compassion for those of us that need them in order to have some sort of a meaningful life. It’s inhumane to cut back dosing amounts to people that seriously need a certain level of pain relief. It does nothing to stop the abuse by those people who don’t need them at all.

    • I agree with all of us who have lived with chronic pain people need to experience it to understand it. So slap yourself on the back for not taking pain meds. BTW 30 pills are standard for surgeries with no refills. So happy for you! You have no idea what this which hunt is doing to pain patients across the contry! These meds taken properly proved a quality of life you’ll never understand ! They don’t know what the are doing band are harming many and threatening the vary physicians that care legally with federal prosecution ! Sleep on that

  • Chronic pain must be experiences to be understood. That is why Geriatric make the best physicians. The curtain between what happened between PROP and CDC concerning the Guidelines has been pulled back similar to the curtain that the Wizard hid behind in the Wizard of OZ. The FDA never approved those guidelines. The correct statistics can be found here. http://www.atipusa.org I urge each and everyone of you to take a look and walk thru and orthopedic and oncology floor. Look at the patients, Work a week doing hospice rounds. It appointed unto every person to die..add to that a part of life filled with pain and agony. Never forget.

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