Introducing Lessons Learned, STAT Plus’ new weekly column on careers in biomedicine. If you’re thinking of jumping from academics to industry/business or vice versa, join us each week for useful tips. 

Who we talked to:

Max Salick, 32, postdoctoral scholar, Novartis (NVS) Institutes for BioMedical Research. Organoid builder. 2017 STAT Wunderkind. Friend of canines.

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  • So cute to think the guy was going to get a professorship by default.
    More like, my academic career is not going anywhere. Let me get out of here!
    Also because, he had only one first author publication, and a lot of coauthorships. That, especially when happening during a PhD, always stink a lot of inflated publication record. LOL

  • This is an Advertorial, another example of how Pharma is continuously misleading the public. These types of advertising and public relations pieces really should be labeled, instead healthcare professionals, policy makers and the general public are being effectively brainwashed. These unethical corporations are spending a lot of money on garbage like this placed conspicuously in formerly credible sites, and mass media.

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