It’s probably not a good idea to assume that even the savviest biotech investors know a PiggyBac transposition from a FLAER reagent, so the fact that the stocks of the three publicly traded CRISPR companies got hammered on Monday after a study (that included both!) questioned CRISPR’s safety might mean nothing. But as more scientists digested the news, it became clear this was no “OMG! Off-target effects!” erroneous report. Here’s why:

CRISPR-Cas9 did what it’s supposed to. Many of the concerns about this genome-editing technology have centered around off-target effects, in which the RNA that guides the DNA-cutting enzyme to its genomic bull’s eye mistakes the intended string of A’s, T’s, C’s, and G’s for a similar one.

Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT Plus and enjoy your first 30 days free!

GET STARTED

What is it?

STAT Plus is STAT's premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.

What's included?

  • Daily reporting and analysis
  • The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters
  • Subscriber-only newsletters
  • Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day
  • Online intelligence briefings
  • Frequent opportunities to engage with veteran beat reporters and industry experts
  • Exclusive industry events
  • Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country
  • The best reporters in the industry
  • The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry
  • And much more
  • Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.

Leave a Comment

Please enter your name.
Please enter a comment.

A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day in science and medicine

Privacy Policy