Young scientists collaborating with CRISPR impresario Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, generally don’t envision mucking about with groundwater teeming with all manner of microscopic beasts. But there they were, analyzing water samples from the abandoned Iron Mountain gold and silver mine in northern California, from an old uranium mine in Colorado, and from a frigid geyser in Utah, in each case running a “metagenomic analysis,” sequencing the genome of every one of the aquatic residents.

It’s like panning for biological gold, and the result was an 18-karat treasure, Doudna and her colleagues announced on Monday: a CRISPR protein different from any previously known, able to edit human genomes like a charm, and with properties that could make it a workhorse of therapeutic editing.

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  • @Joey Zaza – In Sead Pebbles post which was less than 4 hours before yours, Joey stated “does not even buy a coffee every day or anyday on his/her way to work”. Therefore you telling Joey to “give Folgers a try instead of Starbucks” doesn’t help Joey whatsoever.

    Joey also never said anything about drinking or not drinking coffee at home before he leaves for work. So your assumptions are in no way valid or needed. Thank you and have a great day.

  • The following is an incorrect attribution. The metagenomic research to generate the genomes was largely done by the Banfield Lab (UC Berkeley), which is collaborating with the Doudna Lab in follow up work. “Young scientists who land a job in the prestigious University of California, Berkeley, lab of CRISPR impresario Jennifer Doudna don’t envision mucking about with groundwaterteeming with all manner of microscopic beasts. But there they were, analyzing water samples from the abandoned Iron Mountain gold and silver mine in northern California, from an old uranium mine in Colorado, and from a frigid geyser in Utah, in each case running a “metagenomicanalysis,” sequencing the genome of every one of the aquatic residents.” @sxbegle I would appreciate you correcting this story. I would be happy to discuss off line.

  • I come on Google to read stories .
    Free stories on things going in the world , from different sources.
    I can’t even afford the Amazon Prime so I definitely can’t afford a subscription to read articles that you posted up here for people to read .
    Thanks anyway .
    I don’t even buy a coffee every day or anyday on my way to work like a lot of Americans to don’t know where they get their money from but I don’t have it

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