WASHINGTON — Facing hostility from nearly every corner of Capitol Hill, drug makers have spent recent weeks aggressively courting a group of business-friendly Democrats.

PhRMA and BIO, the two major drug industry trade groups, met last week with the New Democrat Coalition, according to multiple Democratic aides. The group, which includes more than 100 members and describes itself as politically moderate and “pro-growth,” has also scheduled meetings with the drug companies Pfizer and Genentech, as well as the California Life Sciences Association (CSLA), which represents drug makers including AbbVie and Allergan.

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  • What is missing are Members of Congress who can combine measures to lower prices with measures to enhance innovation, by increasing grants (increasing NIH budget), subsidizing (restoring ODTC, etc) and rewards for successful R&D (Market Entry Rewards), without relying upon high prices and extended monopolies. Weaning the industry from high prices requires a build-out of R&D measures delinked from prices.

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