All health care reporters deal with the medical system outside of work. But not many of them have dealt with it like Alexandra Glorioso has in recent months.

Glorioso is a reporter for Politico. She’s based in Tallahassee, Fla., and she writes about health care, insurance, and the state legislature. She covers stories like the push to expand Medicaid in Florida and legislative proposals to rein in drug costs.

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  • Actually you are not the first journalist to do this. Elenor Cliffel’s husband, Tom Brazatis sp? the Cleveland Plain Dealer Washington DC Bureau Chief did similar reporting. And I had my husband reach out to him as a survivor.
    Worth a look see or reach out to Ms . Cliffel.
    Best of luck, you never know what you don’t know until things happen!
    Kudus.

  • 1,000 thank yous for sharing! It is more than not easy, disruptive and scary to delve into a cancer diagnosis – it is definitely. Personally I still breath deeper/deeply and kinda cross my fingers now 4 or so years post-operative plus treatment for a lower belly Lymphoma scare which was a problem for me that more than crosses my mind enough where I still tense up for upcoming bloodwork appointments. Kudos to you and the many, myself included, folks quote nudged into an oncologists office or five (😱) considering wellness then and now.
    By the way now I’m accessible lately through Cure Lymphoma on a social media search on Facebook (same profile image type as my actual name on my Facebook Account) for further linkages currently or down the road plus a bit more Q & A potentially…

  • She was very lucky with her contacts that came to her assistance. As she noted most of us don’t have that. I live in a state that didn’t expand medicaid and after my contract was not renewed due to how expensive I was for their insurance (legal in an “at will” state) I had to choose to be homeless because I couldn’t afford health insurance and rent. I needed health insurance due to breast cancer (for the second time) and follicular non-hodgkin’s lymphoma (one of the incurable ones) in the same year. Every year it is an argument with the major cancer center I go to whether or not they will let me keep the apt due to how much I still owe. The connected and the wealthy are set, the rest of us… well lets just say if Canada accepted medical refugees I’d be there in two days (that is how long it would take to drive to the border). At least there I’d be assured of health care.

    • I’m more than sorry to here that – with my cliché though honest *Go figure* since I too encountered such difficult life issues before during and afterwards (though thank goodness for prolonged remission for now plus I wish that for you/you all AND I) that it’s some understanding of doctors not so much when me for sure personally was also neutropenic for the better part of 4-6 days over here – not to assume that that was easily recoverable as well…cancer is so bad bar none that’s about it although once on a while I try to use Stupid Cancer software to connect & share with others.

  • It is also about people who do not have resources to travel to cancer centers.
    University medical centers that do not specialize in cancer just send people home to die.

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