TG Therapeutics (TGTX) on Tuesday delayed yet again the readout from its most important blood cancer clinical trial. And like the previous delay of study results disclosed in September 2018, the biotech’s CEO is papering over the very real risk of failure.

Final results from a Phase 3 clinical trial called UNITY-CLL had been expected to read out in the first quarter, based on the company’s own guidance. On Tuesday, CEO Mike Weiss copped to a problem: The required number of tumor progression events needed to analyze the study haven’t occurred as expected.

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  • You’re definitely right that long-delayed trials is usually a bad sign, likely from the control arm doing better than expected. However, this definitely isn’t always the case. Most recently Karyopharm and the BOSTON trial benefited from this, with the treatment arm doing better than the comparator.

  • Since you’ve never spoken to the company, it may be better if you do so before writing an article. You may be more informed that way.

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