Two years ago, Hua Medicine turned to the public markets to help finance its ambitious diabetes program. “Our future success depends substantially on the success in China of our only clinical drug candidate, dorzagliatin,” the Shanghai-based pharma said in its IPO filing.

The company kept plugging away at the effort quietly until last week, when it announced the completion of its first Phase 3 trial. A positive readout sent the stock soaring 27% — and could make Hua the first company globally to win approval for a novel diabetes therapy known as a glucokinase activator, a class also being developed in the United States, India, and Japan.

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  • Please double-check – the placebo group improved more than the treatment group?

    “Patients who received dorzagliatin at the start of the trial saw their levels of HbA1c, a measure of blood glucose levels, drop by an average of 1.15%, a statistically significant measure. Patients who started on placebo saw their levels reduced by an average of 1.27%.

  • Article didn’t make clear:
    – After 24-week treatment period, effect was 1.15% vs 0.58%
    – After subsequent 28-week open-label phase, when group started on placebo got the drug, effect was 1.11% vs 1.27%

  • See below quote from this article. Are these numbers correct? If so, how can a placebo have better results than the control, and have that be good news for the control intervention?
    Patients who received dorzagliatin at the start of the trial saw their levels of HbA1c, a measure of blood glucose levels, drop by an average of 1.15%, a statistically significant measure. Patients who started on placebo saw their levels reduced by an average of 1.27%.

    • Yeah I was thinking the same. Was looking for a note saying that it was a typo in the original article.

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