For the past three years, various governments and patient advocacy groups have clamored for lower-cost hepatitis C medicines, given the high cure rate for these pricey new drugs. Now, a new study finds that upfront treatment with cheaper generic versions can offer a substantial payback.

Using a mathematical model for patients in India, researchers found that copycat versions costing around $300 would increase life expectancy by more than eight years and reduce lifetime health care costs by more than $1,300 per person. Moreover, treatment became cost effective in two years and upfront costs could be recovered inside of 10 years, according to the analysis published in PLOS ONE.

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  • Facts that are … puzzling? “researchers found that copycat versions costing around $300…” And where will this $300 course of treatment come from vs. current $1,000/pill? Or does this imply $300/pill without saying it?

    • Hi Observer
      Thanks for the note. The researchers used a model and based it on the price for which generic versions of some drugs are available at that price.
      There is a link to the study, so you can read more.
      ed at pharmalot

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