In the latest bid to combat the opioid crisis, several groups representing public health officials, physicians, and safety advocates are urging the Food and Drug Administration to remove “ultra” high-dose opioids from the market, arguing that the risks outweigh the benefits.

In making their case, the groups point to research showing that a person who takes high dosages has a risk of developing an opioid use disorder that is 122 times greater than someone who has not been prescribed opioids, while a person taking a relatively low dose is 15 times as likely to develop a disorder.

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  • I couldn’t agree more. As a former patient, who was prescribed heavy narcotics for my pain, I was made to feel like a “complete lowlife” everytime I went to pick up my prescriptions. It was so troubling and embarrassing, that I finally switched to mail order. People in pain, legitimate pain, who are tolerant to narcotics from being on them longterm, should not be treated like a criminal. Some of these congressman, governor’s, etc… pushing for these ridiculous “3 day max prescriptions”, and similar legislation, should spend some time with burn victims, cancer victims, and other’s suffering in severe pain. Asking these people to fill a pain prescription EVERY 3 DAYS is ridiculous. Can you imagine how these people will be treated when they’re filling prescription over twice a week for month’s or years ??? I’ll bet many would prefer to die than deal with that. I’m appalled that doctors are allowing the government to do this. It’s shameful.

  • I have been a nurse for 20 years and when I started nursing school I was told that the drug didn’t cause addiction (dependence, maybe, addiction – no). It has been my experience is that the medical field swings like a pendulum: for a time, everyone had to have a c-section, now, hardly anyone does, even when a mother’s live is at stake. Every time opioid overdose statistics are mentioned, pharmaceuticals are lumped together with heroin – every time. This serves 2 purposes: to inflate the numbers and to make pain patients equivalent to heroin addicts. Those DEA agents, who now have the Pharmacists running scared, used to have a deal with El Chappo. They gave him his own border crossing, complete with a fake camera, and let him bring all the heroin into the US he wanted to. My husband was working on the border when it was put in place. They don’t care about lives, only getting their piece of the action. I am appaulled by my fellow medical professionals for not standing up for their patients in this “war on patients”. They are educated people, allowing these nit witts to run them scared, with empty threats. I have yet to meet a pharmacist who lost his or her license for dispensing narcotics as ordered by a perscribing physician. The DEA, or their ‘superiors’ the DOJ have no training, no knowledge and no right to mandate quotas for the dispensing of narcotics. I have personally seen the agony of multitudes of patients, many of them on their death beds, paying the price for this fabricated war. I would like to see the statistics on overdoses strictly related to prescription medications, without heroin stats, and how they have changed over the years.

    • I couldn’t agree more. As a former patient, who was prescribed heavy narcotics for my pain, I was made to feel like a “complete lowlife” everytime I went to pick up my prescriptions. It was so troubling and embarrassing, that I finally switched to mail order. People in pain, legitimate pain, who are tolerant to narcotics from being on them longterm, should not be treated like a criminal. Some of these congressman, governor’s, etc… pushing for these ridiculous “3 day max prescriptions”, and similar legislation, should spend some time with burn victims, cancer victims, and other’s suffering in severe pain. Asking these people to fill a pain prescription EVERY 3 DAYS is ridiculous. Can you imagine how these people will be treated when they’re filling prescription over twice a week for month’s or years ??? I’ll bet many would prefer to die than deal with that. I’m appalled that doctors are allowing the government to do this. It’s shameful.

  • Just wondering, were any PAIN PATIENTS maintained on high dose opiates which enable them to have a quality of life invited to this mtg.??? If so, interested in the pain pts on opiate maintenance input. Sadly, Opiate addicts and chronic pain pts. on opiates have all been lumped together as one these days…

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