In an unusual move, a Moscow court has granted a compulsory license to a domestic company that plans to make and sell a version of a best-selling Celgene (CELG) medicine. And tucked into the decision was a reference to promoting public health, a stance that was reiterated this week by a Russian delegate to a United Nations forum on patents, according to one attendee.

At issue is Revlimid, a blockbuster cancer drug that generated $8.2 billion in worldwide sales in 2017 for Celgene. The biotech last year filed a lawsuit against a Russian company called Nativa to ban production and sales of a copycat version. But last month an arbitration court sided with Nativa, which plans to sell its version for 20 percent to 66 percent less, depending upon the dose, a company spokeswoman wrote us.

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