As Washington grapples with rising drug costs, the state of Vermont is edging closer to adopting a program that would designate wholesalers to buy medicines from across the border in Canada.

The Vermont Agency for Human Services late last week completed a report showing the scheme could save up to $5 million annually on just 17 medicines for which two of the state’s three commercial health insurers spent the most money earlier this year. The forecast included a potential 45 percent mark-up on medicines.

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  • Complete lunacy.

    Report says that savings are $1 to $5 million per year. That’s a less impressive figure than the “up to $5 million” stated in article.

    Most importantly: “These savings for commercial payers, post mark-up, do not take into consideration the State’s costs in operating a program of
    wholesale prescription drug importation. ”

    So, Vermont is going to build its own FDA? LOL! Good luck with that. Caveat emptor!

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