Good morning, everyone, and welcome to another working week. We hope the weekend respite was relaxing and invigorating because that oh-so-familiar routine of meetings, deadlines, Skype calls, and presentations — have we forgotten anything? — has returned. But what can you do? After all, the world keeps spinning. So better to be zen and grab a cup of stimulation to cope. On that note, here are a few items of interest to help you along. Hope all goes well today and you conquer the world …

An Oklahoma judge ruled that the first opioid trial against several major drug makers will begin May 28, rejecting their motion for a delay, Reuters writes. Cleveland County District Court Judge Thad Balkman said the matter is of huge public importance. The trial will be the first in the nation to go before a jury that could determine the role of drug makers in the opioid crisis and whether they should pay for it. Purdue Pharma says its decision on whether to file for bankruptcy to avoid being swamped by opioid lawsuits does not depend on the timing of this first trial, Bloomberg News adds.

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  • Let’s see how transparent Anthem will be. Will they still be taking money from their drug spread pricing game? Will they have a level playing field for all pharmacies? Will they open their books and show everybody what they pay themselves? The big question is , will they be willing to get rid of AWP pricing
    and move to a fee for service pricing method and accept a transaction fee?

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