Seeking to recover costs attributed to the opioid crisis, Minnesota has adopted a first-of-its kind law that requires drug makers and wholesalers that market the addictive painkillers to pay various fees.

The move, which is expected to raise an estimated $20 million annually over the next five years, was designed to ensure the state has the financial means to pay for various services, such as addiction prevention and treatment, as a hedge against the outcome of lawsuits that Minnesota officials filed against various opioid makers.

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  • Thanks for the update Ed. You may want to refer to the DisposeRx website for information on at home disposal of unused medications, opioids in particular. Currently several pharmacy chains distribute DRx packets with each opioid Rx and counseling for patients regarding proper disposal.

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