Contribute Try STAT+ Today

One-third of the uses for cancer drugs granted speedy approvals remained on product labeling even after follow-up studies failed to confirm their benefits, according to a new analysis in BMJ. And at the same time, widely-read guidelines for physicians also continued to recommend these treatments.

At issue is the accelerated approval program created nearly three decades ago to hasten availability of drugs for serious conditions with unmet medical needs. However, since the program allows regulators to rely on surrogate measures that are likely to prove effectiveness in exchange for access, drug makers must run trials to later verify the medicines are benefiting patients as intended.

Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free!

GET STARTED

What is it?

STAT+ is STAT's premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.

What's included?

  • Daily reporting and analysis
  • The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters
  • Subscriber-only newsletters
  • Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day
  • STAT+ Conversations
  • Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations
  • Exclusive industry events
  • Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country
  • The best reporters in the industry
  • The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry
  • And much more
  • Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr.

Create a display name to comment

This name will appear with your comment